Chess is life

    • Strategy requires thought;  tactics require observation - Max Euwe 
       
    • “You must also have a sense of when to stop” - Garry Kasparov
    • “When you see a good move, look for a better one” - Emanuel Lasker
       
    • “If a player believes in miracles he can sometimes perform them” - Viktor Korchnoi
    • “To play a really good chess, you must have vision” - Alexander Alekhine
       

“The computer has no ego, no fear, no hope, never gets tired”
 Viktor Korchnoi

“Having preferences means having weaknesses”
(Magnus Carlsen)

 << Everything in chess that has been forgotten is new >>  Viktor Korchnoi

“After you reach the top there's only one way you can go” –  Boris Spassky

"It is easy to play against the young players, for me they are like an open book." - Tigran Petrosian (... times are changin')

"Chess is life"  <Bobby Fischer>

"The only goal in chess is to prove your superiority over the other guy. I mean, your opponent must be destroyed. Fully destroyed"  <Garry Kasparov>

"A surprised opponent is half-beaten" <Garry Kasparov>

"I don't study; I create"  <Viktor Korchnoi>

“If you wait for luck to turn up, life becomes very boring” -  Mikhail Tal

"In chess, as in life, a man is his own most dangerous opponent" - Vasily Smyslov

"Some part of a mistake isalways correct "
"Im Schach lernt man nur durch Fehler“
(Tartakower)

-- There is no beauty without some strangeness -- Edgar Allan Poe Cool

"Never believe for a second that you are weak!"

The best move is the one that disturbs the opponent the most! (anonymous)

When the chess game is over, the pawn and the king go back to the same box 
(Irish saying contributed by Etienne Goldstein)

Everything I need to know to be successful in the game of life I learned from the game of chess:

This idea and resulting conversation are perhaps best explained by enumeration of generic chess playing principals, such as -

- There is a readily discernable cause and effect for everything (i.e. for every move I make)
- I have only limited time to think and make decisions over the board and there are consequences to moving too quickly or too slowly

- Documented, transparent moves speak for themselves and no excuses are relevant
(you cannot deny or debate the facts/moves which speak for themselves)
- The strongest force or approach is not necessarily the most desirable in all situations
- Positioning is everything and positions change constantly
- All action typically emanates from and is connected to the center
- Once the move/decision is made its difficult if not impossible to take it back
- The first mistake made, haven shaken the player, often results in another
- Winning is not always a matter of having the most material things
- Sometimes the threat itself is actually stronger than its full execution
- Failure/defeat is often quite apparent if not inevitable before the very end
- Even a little, casual ill timed or ill advised mistake can undue vast preparations and seemingly invincible positions
- There is often a better alternative to the very first impression, considering alternatives
- Intuition is powerful and essential but also develops from principles and experience
- If you play a position poorly several times, you will eventually learn from it

- Preparation and homework usually pay off, all other things being equal
- If you make decisions based on emotions alone, then you are in trouble
- A sound mind and game plan usually exist and propel from within a sound body
- Your pieces have the most power when they work together
(the king is only great because he has pieces to protect him)
- Just because you play the opening well, there still might be a middle and endgame
- Sometimes the best outcome is a draw, with both sides having made concessions and hoping for more the next time
- And the impact: It's no fun to win all the time ... low aim is crime, not failure !!

note: There is absolutely nothing ruthless about the game of chess (or others) – it is simply a contest and comparison of wills and ideas, neither good or evil, just the pureness of voluntary competition governed by mutually agreed upon, objective and ultimately fair & equitable rules.


Louis Buccino, https://www.ted.com/

(Saint Petersburg, Florida, United Staates)